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The Highs & Lows of Travel

In The Art of Travel, Paris, 8. Troubles by Tessa2 Comments

I’m actually a really easygoing traveler.  I don’t care how I get somewhere, or how long it takes, as long as I can eventually get there.  I’m not picky about means of transportation (I took an 11-hour bus to Munich for Oktoberfest), or how fancy my accommodation (I slept in a van while traveling Iceland) is once I’m there as …

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First Day

In The Art of Travel, 8. Troubles, Washington DC by Matthew Chung1 Comment

This semester I was privileged with the opportunity to intern with U.S. Department of the Treasury. Despite the remarkable nature of this job, I had very little job experience coming in to the Treasury Department. Besides a couple of weeks I spent grading ACT tests for my old academy, which I don’t really consider a job, the only time I …

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Stuck Here Forever??

In The Art of Travel, 7. Free topic, Washington DC by SoniaLeave a Comment

My favorite part of DC is the abundance of opportunities there are in my field of international relations. The variety in internships, free seminars and events, and accessibility of scholars/experts have helped me grow as both a student and a young professional. In Shanghai, I wasn’t able to find any internships that were relevant to my field. In New York, …

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Der Lorax

In Berlin, The Art of Travel, 7. Free topic by Gillian1 Comment

I’ve always enjoyed autumn the most of all seasons, and it occurred to me right before I left for Berlin that I will not have experienced autumn in New York for two years. This realization at first tinged my excitement for Berlin with sadness. Autumn in New York just has a certain je ne sais quois–that same sharp New York …

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La Flâneuse

In The Art of Travel, Paris, 7. Free topic by JaxxLeave a Comment

It seems almost impossible to study in Paris without encountering the idea of Le Flâneur or La Flâneuse. They are the wanderers, loungers, strollers. They are those people who observe and comment on urban life, who walk to reflect and see the world around them. A friend of mine who studied here her freshman year even has a tattoo of …

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Traveling to the Land Down Under

In The Art of Travel, 7. Free topic, Washington DC by Matthew ChungLeave a Comment

During my second semester of freshman year at New York University, I had the opportunity to take several different options of classes available to Steinhardt’s Honors Students. While being in the program and being able to take classes like these ones was satisfying and advantageous in its own right, the most significant feature of this program was its benefit of …

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Amsterdam’s Plea to Tourists: Visit, but Please Behave Yourselves

In extra, News, Art of Travel News by ProfLeave a Comment

NY Times: AMSTERDAM — It’s not a problem many vacation destinations spend much effort worrying about or money trying to fix: the wrong kind of tourist. But that is the challenge increasingly faced by Amsterdam, where visitor numbers have shot up more than 60 percent in the past decade, bolstered by low-cost flights, cheap accommodation and the ease of traveling …

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Can the world be saved from overtourism?

In extra, News, Art of Travel News by ProfLeave a Comment

(CNN) — Every week seems to bring new confirmation we’ve officially entered the era of too much tourism. There’s been sand pilfering in Sardinia and Venice visitors threatened with fines for sitting down. Over in Rome, there’s been selfie-based violence and illegal bathing. In Madrid, stringent rules have been put in place to handle Airbnb as locals fear being priced …

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From Sardinia To The Sangre De Cristo Mountains: How Travel Influenced The Writings of D.H. Lawrence

In Florence News, News, Art of Travel News by ProfLeave a Comment

Literary Traveler: “Comes over one an absolute necessity to move.” If one quotation could sum up a person’s life, this opening line from the travelogue Sea and Sardinia may best epitomize one of the most scandalous and autobiographical writers of the 20th century: D.H. Lawrence. From the first time he left England in 1912 to his untimely death in France in …

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What to Do if Your Flight Is Delayed or Canceled

In Uncategorized, News, Art of Travel News by ProfLeave a Comment

NY Times Frugal Traveler: As menacing clouds hung heavy over Lower Manhattan, I cruised toward the Holland Tunnel on my way to Newark Liberty International Airport. I refreshed the flight status for my United Airlines flight, and the airline’s app showed an on-time departure. Two minutes later, I refreshed it. A red bar suddenly appeared on my smartphone — the flight …

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“Genius Loci” in Santa Croce complex, Florence, Sept. 20-22

In Florence News, News, Art of Travel News by ProfLeave a Comment

The Florentine: Let the spirit of Santa Croce sink in over this three-day event hosted by Controradio. “Genius Loci” refers to the soul of a place—and what place has a more distinct one than the Temple of Italian Glories? Organized in two marathon sessions (6pm-midnight September 20 and 21) and one shorter spurt (6-7.30am September 22), the event explores the …

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Voluptuous Panic: Babylon Berlin

In Berlin News, The Art of Travel Spring 2018, News, Art of Travel News by ProfLeave a Comment

New York Review of Books: “In the streets of Berlin, one is often struck by the momentary insight that someday all this will suddenly burst apart,” observed the critic and journalist Siegfried Kracauer in a 1926 essay on the city’s picture palaces. Because of its fragility, the irreconcilable forces that threatened it, and the apocalyptic air that came to enshroud …

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Venice to separate tourists and locals over busy May Day weekend

In Uncategorized, News, Art of Travel News by ProfLeave a Comment

CNN Travel: Venice has come up with a new plan to cope with the huge numbers of visitors that continue to strain its infrastructure: segregating locals and tourists. Ahead of one of the biggest holiday weekends of the year, the Italian city is implementing new measures that will restrict the movement of visitors and turn away some motorists. The extraordinary …

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NYU Admits Most Selective and Most Diverse Class in History

In Uncategorized, NYU News, News by ProfLeave a Comment

After reading through more than 75,000 admissions applications for its campuses in New York, Abu Dhabi, and Shanghai (a 12 percent increase over last year, and more than 100 percent increase over 2007), NYU has as of today notified 15,722 prospective students of their acceptance to NYU’s class of 2022. For the first time in NYU history, the initial acceptance …

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10 untranslatable Italian phases we need in English

In Florence News, News, Art of Travel News by ProfLeave a Comment

Matador: EVERY LANGUAGE has phrases or words that can stump a local when translating to an outsider. Italian has many untranslatable terms that are woven into not only the language but culture, too. If learning Italian, it’s important to know how to use “Mamma mia!” without automatically saying “here we go again” and fill your plate at an “apericena” buffet. Here …

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29 signs that you’ve gone full Australian

In Sydney News, News, Art of Travel News by ProfLeave a Comment

Matador: IT’S HAPPENING. You start asking people how they’re “going.” Most of your sentences end in “eh” or “mate.” You’re fiercely loyal to either Woolies or Coles. And you know what a “drop bear” is… or isn’t. You can’t deny it — you’re becoming more Aussie by the day. 1. “Far out!” is your response to pretty much everything. 2. …

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10 untranslatable German terms

In Berlin News, News, Art of Travel News by ProfLeave a Comment

Matador: THE GERMAN LANGUAGE is ranked as one of the easiest languages for English speakers to learn as both are a branch of the West Germanic language tree. That said, German can also be a complicated language to directly translate as words are often a conglomeration of multiple words, forming words we just don’t have in English. Often times, these words …

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In Florence, Finding the Legacy of One of Literature’s Great Couples

In Florence News, News, Art of Travel News by ProfLeave a Comment

New York Times: They were an unlikely couple: he a young writer, dashing and ambitious, she a highly lauded poet six years his senior, a middle-aged invalid whose father kept her housebound. But when Robert Browning sent Elizabeth Barrett a fan letter in January 1845 — “I love your verses with all my heart, dear Miss Barrett,” he gushed — …

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