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Who is this for?

In The Travel Habit, 8. Grapes of Wrath, cont by Jack1 Comment

Who is Grapes of Wrath written for?  It is one of those odd books that exists as a cautionary tale, a historical relic, and a championing of the working class.  Steinbeck said of his writing, “My whole work drive has been aimed at making people understand each other and then I deliberately write this book, the aim of which is …

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The Omnipresent Forces

In The Travel Habit, 8. Grapes of Wrath, cont by Aroushi1 Comment

One element that stands out in the first few chapters of the “Grapes of Wrath” is Steinbeck’s use of recurring environmental motifs – particularly that of the sun and the desert. From the onset of chapter 1, the sun is an ever-present force in Joad’s life. The sun appears to be something extremely violent – an oppressive force that represents …

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Revolutionary Whispers?

In The Travel Habit, 8. Grapes of Wrath, cont by Jason GabaeeLeave a Comment

In His Essay, “Audience and Closure in The Grapes of Wrath”, Nicholas Visser writes, The difficulties Steinbeck had with closure in The Grapes of Wrath may stem in part from the very success he had in gaining access to his audience. Appealing to public opinion entails granting a measure of legitimacy to the social order the presumptive audience inhabits. Appealing …

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One Family

In The Travel Habit, 8. Grapes of Wrath, cont by Amy GreenspanLeave a Comment

By the second half of the book, the Joad’s, as Casy foreshadowed in the beginning, begin to adopt this sense of “free love”. Their conventional family unit begins to break down and shape shift until it no longer exists in its original form. As the Joads begin to weave themselves into the fabric of Route 66 and of the collective …

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Brother Against Brother

In The Travel Habit, 8. Grapes of Wrath, cont by Laura Casado1 Comment

Steinbeck wrote Grapes of Wrath in atypical novel format. Instead of a straightforward, continual biography of the Joad family, he breaks up their story by chapters that are outwardly narrated and historically reflective, even critical. Steinbeck inserted this segments in a fluid manner that offers a refreshing respite, stylistically, from the rest of the novel and further allows him to …

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Blame it On The —- Probably Us.

In The Travel Habit, 8. Grapes of Wrath, cont by Zoe Hall1 Comment

In 1930, Charles Michelson coined the term ‘Hooverville’ in reference to the shantytowns made up of homeless migrants that developed under the Hoover administration. Mostly as a criticism of the Hoover administration, ‘the shanties’ of these communities were made up of stray bits of cardboard, wood, glass, scraps of whatever could be found. These pseudo-civilizations cleverly embody the situation of …

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A Way Out? 

In The Travel Habit, 8. Grapes of Wrath, cont by Jessie Cao1 Comment

The ending of John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath was unexpected. After seeing so many pains and helplessness, I though the book would end in a bleak note. However, Steinbeck seems to offer us a solution to this social inequality and oppression experienced by the poor. In Chapter 29, Tom seems to experience a spiritual rebirth after his hiding in …

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Ma

In The Travel Habit, 8. Grapes of Wrath, cont by Frank Cheng1 Comment

Ma was the most carefully described female in the book. She was the backbone of the family and she represented those who overthrew the male-based America during 1930s. Story is based on the world driven by men and men-ran machine and capitalism. The economic growth in the 20s has its ‘sin’ of oppressing the low-income, the minorities and female. It …