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How to Travel?

In Writers on the Road, The Travel Habit Fall 2014 by cLeave a Comment

“Have you ever seen a freshly plowed field, just after the soil is turned, and it is all black and rich-looking, with no vegetation at all? Well, that’s what a cornfield looks like after the hoppers are finished” (Pyle 52). Ernie Pyle, Home Country What is travel?   More specifically, what is travel during the period of the Great Depression and …

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Hopelessness

In Writers on the Road, The Travel Habit Fall 2014 by Freddy Leiva1 Comment

I found Lorena Hickok’s One Third of a Nation particularly striking and emotionally provocative. From the beginning of her account we are painted a very dark visual image of the “unemployed” when she writes, “Four years ago, to the writer, they were not really people at all. They had no faces. They were just the ‘unemployed.’ Muffled figures, backs curved …

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Escapism

In Writers on the Road, The Travel Habit Fall 2014 by Karishma SondeLeave a Comment

When Lorena Hickok heads to Miami, the tourist season isn’t just an escape for the middle class people, but also for those suffering from the depression. Tourist season allows them to escape the meager conditions of where they were: with little relief aid and “foodless holidays,” they are given little choice than to escape that life to get to the …

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Depression Era Detachment or a New Solution?

In Writers on the Road, The Travel Habit Fall 2014 by Kira WilliamsLeave a Comment

James Rorty writes of the detachment of the American people he met in his travels. He calls them a “profound failure of American life” and asks what that failure would lead to. The people, according to his observations, had not “possessed the landscape” he experienced throughout his journey, and it had not possessed them (56). During the Depression, most of …

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Pushing the Personal

In Writers on the Road, The Travel Habit Fall 2014 by EllisLeave a Comment

There’s a certain difficulty in undertaking national studies and using individual narratives as evidence. In Pyle, Hickok and Rorty, this tension becomes quite clear.  In Where Life is Better Rorty is struck by the absence of Marxist understanding of the Great Depression across the nation. He tasks himself with collecting stories that will help him situate his structural analysis in …

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Yesterday’s Gone

In Writers on the Road, The Travel Habit Fall 2014 by Nancee1 Comment

Is it not hope that has served as a gateway to so many successes? Even in the weariest of moments, we must not forget that there is another day ahead. Like Fleetwood Mac says, “don’t stop thinking about tomorrow”. Therefore, I was surprised to read Rorty’s damnation of those who do keep onto hope. It seems that he believes that …