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Strange Synchronicities

In The Travel Habit Fall 2014, Tourism in the 30s by c1 Comment

What is motion? Moreover, what is, in James Agee’s words ‒ in his article entitled “The American Roadside” ‒ “motion with the least possible interruption” (Agee 47). And what of this motion when it is inevitable as for those on the road for reasons of being ‘hit hard’ by the Great Depression, and when it is a choice (or ‘choice’), …

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Vacationing

In The Travel Habit Fall 2014, Tourism in the 30s by Graydon FeinsteinLeave a Comment

I enjoyed reading Berkowitz’s “A ‘New Deal’ for Leisure-Making Mass Tourism during the Great Depression” and what I first found very interesting was how the majority of Americans didn’t value or even consider taking vacations prior to the 1930s. Extended time off was a luxury of the wealthy and for anyone else, it usually meant unemployment. Employers valued a good …

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Early Travel

In The Travel Habit Fall 2014, Tourism in the 30s by Freddy Leiva1 Comment

“A ‘New Deal’ for Leisure ” by Michael Berkowitz is a very interesting piece on the birth of paid vacations for employees. “Most employees, imbued with the ideology of the work ethic, saw little need to give either white-collar personnel or manual workers paid vacations. Wage earners, for their part, were uninterested in extended periods of time off that, for …

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Adaption in Travel

In The Travel Habit Fall 2014, Tourism in the 30s by Sydney1 Comment

Roland Wild’s Double-Crossing America raises a couple of interesting points about traveling.  The story focuses around the narrator who takes his family abroad to America to travel across the country.  He comments on how he would very much like to make the journey, and yet places many contingencies upon his ability to do so.  He comes up with excuses like …

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Labor & the Logic of the “Travel Habit”

In The Travel Habit Fall 2014, Tourism in the 30s by Ellis1 Comment

The travel habit was calculated and cultivated not by workers who felt they could benefit from leisure time, but by capitalists and later government officials who thought they could profit from it, politically and financially.  “A ‘New Deal’ for Leisure” by Michael Berkowitz begins with a disclaimer: it was not the labor movement that fought for paid vacation. Rank and …

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The Travel Necessity

In The Travel Habit Fall 2014, Tourism in the 30s by Greta1 Comment

Various beliefs about vacation (specifically American tourism) allowed for it to grow to become a staple in American life. Businesses believed that paid vacations would give their employees “the opportunity for rejuvenation that would make them more efficient,” but only if they went “away somewhere,” not if they stayed at home (194, Being Elsewhere). They also thought paid vacations would …

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Eyes on the Ground

In The Travel Habit Fall 2014, Tourism in the 30s by Nancee1 Comment

I really enjoyed the idea Berkowitz discusses in A “New Deal” for Leisure that tourism was promoted as a way to reinforce America’s strength on the microlevel. By encouraging its people to travel, the country would ultimately strengthen based on these people’s knowledge of and pride in America. Amongst so many class and social divides, a larger unity was being …