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Lost Boy

In Wayfinding, Shanghai, The Art of Travel Fall 2014 by Kyle2 Comments

Kevin Lynch claims that becoming “completely lost” is a rarity thanks to “maps, street numbers, route signs, [and] bus placards.” Kevin Lynch has clearly never been to Shanghai. Last night, I was returning from my first day at an internship across town. While on the subway, I realized that the line I was on did not go to NYU. This …

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My Golden Ticket

In Wayfinding, Shanghai, The Art of Travel Fall 2014 by Benjamin Engler1 Comment

As has been the theme of my previous two posts, communication in Shanghai has been difficult to say the least. In our generation, however, “wayfinding” has become an activity which you can typically do successfully while relying only on yourself and your smartphone’s map application.  While I expected the little blue dot on my iPhone to be my guiding force, I hadn’t …

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Wǒ bù shuō zhōngguó huà

In Wayfinding, Shanghai, The Art of Travel Fall 2014 by Andrew Graham1 Comment

The backseat of the cab vibrates as the trunk swings closed with a loud thud. An undersized, elderly Chinese man wearing loose striped pajamas climbs into the driver’s seat and looks at me through the rearview mirror. His brow remains permanently furrowed as he stares. “Hi, how’s it going?” I say. “Here’s where I’m headed.” I hand the cabbie a …

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Embracing the Barrier

In Wayfinding, Shanghai, The Art of Travel Fall 2014 by Nicolas Lopez1 Comment

Unlike countries which speak a romance language there is simply no real overlap of words, expressions or even gestures between Spanish and Mandarin. Having no knowledge on the language other than the most basic words, I immediately realized I would have to make communication work through alternative means. Regardless, I was determined to not allow the barriers between our peoples …

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Flustered and Furious: Tokyo Stint

In Wayfinding, Shanghai, The Art of Travel Fall 2014 by Rachel Levine-RamirezLeave a Comment

In modern day America, getting truly lost is almost impossible.  Especially in New York, unless you venture into the depths of the West Village or traverse through Central Park, the genius grid system makes exploring relatively easy.  And even better, if you are ever lost, everybody speaks English!  Or you can pull up Google Maps on your iPhone!  The same …

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Lost in Language

In Wayfinding, Shanghai, The Art of Travel Fall 2014 by Andrew Eisenson1 Comment

According to my “Laoshi”, my “Long Island” accent is too strong and too heavy for the soft, petite tones and diction required for basic Chinese speaking. Even with phonetics and the English translation, still I am not understood. Fortunately enough, getting around has not been a problem thus far. As I am always surrounded by people who speak fluent Chinese, …