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Language

In Communicating, Shanghai, The Art of Travel Fall 2014 by Cyrus1 Comment

As Botton explained, the word ‘exotic’ has a different meaning everywhere. To me an ‘exotic’ quality derives from a faraway object. It is like a horizon, when you think you’re getting closer it’s unreachable. In the case of exoticism, the more familiar you become with a foreign culture, the less it seems exotic. As I explore the mannerisms of Shanghai …

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Up Against It: Imaginary and real barriers

In Communicating, Shanghai, The Art of Travel Fall 2014 by Andrew GrahamLeave a Comment

For the first time in my life, I feel the burden of a language barrier. The inability to communicate with locals in China can feel frustrating, especially when I think back to my last travel abroad experience. Studying away in an English-speaking nation like the United Kingdom couldn’t be more different from facing the unfamiliar sounds of Mandarin each day. …

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Communication Dictionary: A Flaubert Style Catalogue

In Communicating, Shanghai, The Art of Travel Fall 2014 by Haley Menchel2 Comments

To say that communication is difficult for me here in Shanghai is an understatement. Having any sort of a back and fourth is impossible, but it’s afforded me the opportunity to explore other means of communication such as: hand gestures, vocal fluctuation and mixing languages. To mimic Flaubert’s “On the Exotic” I want to create a dictionary if you will for my …

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Babel

In Communicating, Shanghai, The Art of Travel Fall 2014 by James Gregory1 Comment

Coming to Shanghai, I had some understanding of the language barrier that I would face once I arrived. In nearly every place I have ever visited, English was either the spoken language, or most of the native population had a basic understanding of English, and therefore I was able to communicate with them with relative ease. I knew that very …

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Reduced to a Pre-schooler

In Communicating, Shanghai, The Art of Travel Fall 2014 by KyleLeave a Comment

Before arriving in Shanghai, my Chinese was at “beginner-textbook” level. The reason I add the “textbook” part instead simply saying “beginner” is because my Chinese was – like a textbook – only good on paper. Was it practical? I thought so. But when I got to the Shanghai airport, my dreams were shattered by my taxi driver. When I tried to have a …

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Lost Boy

In Wayfinding, Shanghai, The Art of Travel Fall 2014 by Kyle2 Comments

Kevin Lynch claims that becoming “completely lost” is a rarity thanks to “maps, street numbers, route signs, [and] bus placards.” Kevin Lynch has clearly never been to Shanghai. Last night, I was returning from my first day at an internship across town. While on the subway, I realized that the line I was on did not go to NYU. This …