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Borges for “Los eruditos”

In The Art of Travel Spring 2017, 10. Books (2), Buenos Aires by Matthew G1 Comment

The United States, despite prolifically producing literature, films, music, and culture for not only our own consumption, but that of the entire world, lacks a single defining work or author that represents the depth of the American experience.  In short, there is no “Great American Novel.”  And for that matter, you would be hard pressed to pick a single artist …

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The Diverse Roots of Tango

In The Art of Travel Spring 2017, 10. Books (2), Buenos Aires by VanessaLeave a Comment

In the book, ¡Tango! The Dance, the Song, the Story,  the following questions are posed about something that is considered without  a doubt to be quintessentially Argentine, tango. The book contains four distinct stories about the genealogy of tango and while each story or essay is unique they all share a similar skepticism; whether we should focus on the essential  and …

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Contemporary Issues through Art

In The Art of Travel Spring 2017, 9. Art & Place, Buenos Aires by Alexandra GLeave a Comment

Lo normal (1978) – Mónica Mayer I have been to the MALBA, Museo de Arte Latinoamericana de Buenos Aires, various times. The current exhibit is called Verboamérica. The exhibit has a very strong focus on violence, exclusion and the denial and oppression of certain identities throughout Latin America. It is curated in a way that divides the different types of …

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Personal Thoughts on Travel 2.0

In The Art of Travel Spring 2017, 7. Travel 2.0, Buenos Aires by Alexandra G1 Comment

In the past three years alone, I have experienced very different types of traveling. I’ve been on family vacations in big resorts, I’ve lived abroad in two different countries for a year at a time, I’ve spent summers visiting family, I’ve done various road trips including from Connecticut to New Mexico, I’ve travelled with friends only from hostel to hostel, …

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Find your Patagonia.

In The Art of Travel Spring 2017, 6. Book #1, Buenos Aires by Alexandra GLeave a Comment

It is so very surprising, but so stunning to me, how little travel in Argentina has changed since the 60s and 70s. Bruce Chatwin, a British travel writer, published In Patagonia in 1977. His descriptions of Buenos Aires, Patagonia, Argentine people, Argentine mentality, immigrants and even methods and means of travel are so very similar to what I have currently …

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Students abroad: Culture of University Coddling

In The Art of Travel Spring 2017, 8. Bubble, Buenos Aires by VanessaLeave a Comment

The study abroad bubble is real and it’s a pernicious bubble indeed. As of 2017, New York University has twelve satellite campuses and the number of students who are graduating at other NYU portal campuses, which include Shanghai and Abu Dhabi, is only increasing every year. One of NYU’s selling points to weary eyed high school seniors includes its plethora …

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A Contradicting View on Immigration

In The Art of Travel Spring 2017, 5. Politics, Buenos Aires by Alexandra G1 Comment

Argentina, much like the United States, a country founded by immigration. The Spaniards that settled and established the country of Argentina are technically to be considered immigrants. From the moment I arrived in Buenos Aires, I quickly learned that Argentina struggles with the idea of native vs. foreign, home vs. abroad, nationalism vs. cosmopolitanism. Unfortunately, I find the city and …