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2016: The Year the Placemaking Movement Went Global

In News, SOP News, Art of Travel News by Prof

Project for Public Spaces: The placemaking movement in 2016 continued its trajectory from a once quiet movement to a global platform to reinvent the way we shape our cities and communities. Bubbling up from every corner of the world and every sector, discipline, and cause, the placemaking movement demonstrated its capacity to provide the common ground between disparate partners necessary to implement the recently …

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The Importance of Placemaking and Unlocking Community Capital

In News, SOP News, Art of Travel News by Prof

Sononews.com: In Europe and North America, millions of citizens are moving back to cities and denser urban areas. These interconnected networks have served as hubs of innovation for centuries, providing our societies with the best opportunities to succeed, leading to the creation of the world’s most innovative products, companies, and people. With the rapid growth and production of the automobile …

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Urbanization and the urban sprawl are threatening to make small towns even smaller—and tourists’ nostalgia may be their savior

In News, SOP News, Art of Travel News by Prof

Quartz: The streets of Woodstock, Vermont felt like a movie set when I stepped out of my car. It looked as if any minute someone would shout “action!” and actors would appear in the windows of the ornate brick buildings to sing a jubilant theme song. It was lunchtime in July. People were popping in and out of F.H. Gillingham & Sons …

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Dorothea Lange’s Censored Photographs of FDR’s Japanese Concentration Camps

In News, Travel Habit News by Prof

Dorothea Lange—well-known for her FSA photographs like Migrant Mother—was hired by the U.S. government to make a photographic record of the “evacuation” and “relocation” of Japanese-Americans in 1942. She was eager to take the commission, despite being opposed to the effort, as she believed “a true record of the evacuation would be valuable in the future.” The military commanders that reviewed her work …

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Inequality Is Killing The American Dream

In News, Travel Habit News by Prof

Decades of rising income inequality and slowing economic growth have eroded a pillar of the American dream: the hope that each generation will do better than the one that came before, according to new research released Thursday. If the findings hold up, they have profound economic, social and even political implications. The decline in what economists call “mobility” — how …

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Take a peek at Elton John’s impressive photography collection

In News, Travel Habit News by Prof

Elton John might be better known across the globe for his catchy tunes, yet he is starting to gather a reputation for this passion for art and his impressive photography collection.The singer’s home in Atlanta currently houses more than 8,000 images taken between 1920 and 1950 with about 70 photographers featured. Among the collection there are works by Berenice Abbott, …

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After nearly fading into obscurity, Route 66 celebrates 90th birthday

In News, Travel Habit News by Prof

In several respects, the automobile was one of the most significant inventions of the twentieth century, but often overlooked and equally significant is the development of the roads those automobiles traveled upon. Route 66 was not the first cross-country road nor is it the oldest road, but the highway has lodged itself into the imagination of travelers and became one …

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Dorothea Lange’s Granddaughter Continues Her Legacy

In News, Travel Habit News by Prof

Dorothea Lange is best known for her portraiture photography documenting America’s Great Depression. Her image “Migrant Mother” depicts a destitute woman with three children in California. It is one of the most recognized photographic portrayals of that era. When Lange passed away in 1965, her granddaughter, Dyanna Taylor, inherited one of her cameras and began to follow in her footsteps. …

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LIFE Magazine Launched 80 Years Ago with Margaret Bourke-White photos

In News, Travel Habit News by Prof

The story that made the cover of the very first issue of LIFE Magazine—published on Nov. 23, 1936—was, the magazine’s editors admitted, perhaps surprising. The photo of Fort Peck Dam in Montana, by Margaret Bourke-White, was a stark and graphic image, accompanying a more human story about the people whose lives were changed by the New Deal project. It was …