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Iconic WPA Posters Are Becoming Gorgeous Postage Stamps

In extra, Travel Habit News by Prof

Next year’s commemorative stamps will feature a retrospective on the Works Progress Administration, better known as the WPA. Created by the Franklin D. Roosevelt Administration in 1935 as a way to create jobs for a populace still recovering from the Great Depression, the WPA at its peak employed more than 3 million workers. WPA workers spanned a wide variety of …

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Taschen’s New Deal Photography goes well beyond familiar Depression-era image

In extra, Travel Habit News by Prof

If you purchase a copy of New Deal Photography: USA 1935-1943 by Peter Walther hoping to find iconic Farm Security Administration images, such as the migrant mother by Dorothea Lange or the father and his two sons running in a dust storm by Arthur Rothstein, you will not be disappointed. With almost 400 photographs filling its 608 pages, including numerous …

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James Franco, Lola Sultan talk Steinbeck’s ‘In Dubious Battle’

In extra, Travel Habit News by Prof

The guy will just not stop. James Franco continues to defy any definition of rational workload. The actor-director-writer-artist-producer-teacher has an ambitious new project making the film festival rounds. In Dubious Battle, adapted from one of John Steinbeck’s earlier and lesser known novels (published in 1936), tells the story of a fruit-workers’ strike in California. “I always liked Steinbeck.”, says James …

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Walker Evan’s look at the Lehigh Valley in the Depression era

In extra, Travel Habit News by Prof

A cross-shaped gravestone sits atop a hillside cemetery. At the bottom of the hill, rowhomes, telephone polls and smokestacks from a steel mill clutter the area. The gravestone is in St. Michael’s Cemetery. The homes are part of a neighborhood in South Bethlehem. Those smokestacks belong to Bethlehem Steel. The year is 1935. The photographer who captured the image is Walker …

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How the media covers the ‘deplorables’

In extra, Travel Habit News by Prof

I remember when I saw my first “deplorable.” I was in my teens. He was the subject of a photograph by Berenice Abbott. The picture has haunted me as a person, and as a journalist, ever since. In 1935, Abbott traveled through Ohio, Pennsylvania and the Deep South, taking pictures of the people and places she encountered. Though not done …

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NY Times: 20 places to travel in your 20s

In extra, extra 2, Art of Travel News by Prof

New York Times: There’s no better way to change your perception of the world — and maybe yourself — than travel. You’ll experience different cultures, meet new friends and make lifelong memories. But traveling in your 20s poses challenges: You might have financial constraints, limited time off from work and concerns about safety. So think of this selection of 20 …

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What We See When We Look at Travel Photography

In extra, extra 2, Art of Travel News by Prof

New York Times: There is a vast gulf between how people tend to think of “tourism,” an agreeable pursuit for themselves and a great benefit to their local economy, and how people tend to think of other tourists, as interlopers, beholden to oafish appetites for packaged experience. Those of us who travel professionally, with a view to record for those …

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Dorothea Lange and the Making of “Migrant Mother”

In extra, extra 2, Travel Habit News by Prof

Recently, a community in Nipomo, CA came together to celebrate the 80th anniversary of Dorothea Lange’s now-iconic photograph known as Migrant Mother. In the 1930s, Lange was a photographer working for the Farm Securities Administration (FSA), one of the governmental agencies President Franklin Roosevelt helped to establish in order to address the country’s large-scale unemployment. Lange and her colleagues were charged …

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Talking Jane Jacobs and Urban Planning with Citizen Jane director

In extra, SOP News by Prof

Don’t call “Citizen Jane: Battle for the City” a biopic. Matt Tyrnauer’s fleetly paced but exhaustive documentary, having its world premiere at the Hot Docs Cinema today, isn’t concerned with the life of the journalist, self-trained urban planner, and long-time Toronto resident so much as the life of the key idea she brought into the world: that cities like New …

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Book review: Mark Twain’s adventures abroad get fascinating treatment

In extra, News, Art of Travel News by Prof

Book Review: Chasing the Last Laugh: Mark Twain’s Raucous and Redemptive Round-the-World Comedy Tour by Richard Zacks. Ever enthusiastic about making “promising” investments — in state-of-the-art printing processes, his own publishing company, a designing machine for cloth and carpets, and a dietary supplement — Mark Twain found himself, in 1895, hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt. He was 60 …

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The Lowdown on Studying Abroad

In extra, News, Art of Travel News by Prof

Washington Square News: While most students flocked to the Washington Square campus to start the 2016-2017 year, some 1,500 undergraduate students opted to book a different flight by beginning the school year at study away locations. In addition to NYU’s three degree-granting campuses at New York, Abu Dhabi and Shanghai, NYU also boasts 11 study away sites: Accra, Berlin, Buenos …

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Which are the most international universities in the U.S.? NYU ranks #1

In extra, News, Art of Travel News by Prof

Are you considering studying abroad? For many students, it’s a comfort to know that while they’re miles away from home, at least they have a supportive community of fellow international students to rely on. Even popular university rankings such as Times Higher Education, U.S. News Education, and the Complete University Guide measure universities based on their international student body. The U.S. just happens to …