View Post

The Pain of Leaving Home

In Steinbeck (1), The Travel Habit by Melanie0 Comments

The Dust Bowl along with the Great Depression was an incredibly difficult time for millions of farmers across America. People whose livelihood and dignity was tied to the land they worked saw themselves torn from that land as conditions worsened and banks began pushing them out of their own homes. This is perhaps one of the most persistent themes throughout …

View Post

At the Hands of Another

In Steinbeck (2), The Travel Habit by Michael0 Comments

The plight of John Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath is no exception the other works we have read this semester in the sense that all of the main characters’ suffering was caused by other human beings. At the beginning of the novel, the Joan’s family farm was repossessed by the bank, and the family was forced to move out West. As …

View Post

Cumulative culture

In The Travel Habit, West (2) by Coco0 Comments

On: America as a “Proper Receptacle”: Nathanael West’s A Cool Million, Naomi Kubo I found it interesting to be made aware of the contrasting facts the writer emphasizes: Indeed America has little to no cumulative culture, and yet everyone was and is looking so desperately to find some ‘All American’ nationalistic values. In ‘America as a “Proper Receptacle’, Naomi Kubo …

View Post

Rose of Sharon’s Smile

In Steinbeck (2), The Travel Habit by Kiril0 Comments

I find it particularly striking that, by the time the reader reaches the end of the book, there is little or one could even say nothing to look forward to. There is no apparent resolution to anything in the book. Grampa and then Granma Joad died. Noah left the family. Connie fled, afraid to be a husband and a father. …

View Post

Granma and Grampa

In Steinbeck (1), The Travel Habit by Kiril1 Comment

The deaths, in rapid succession, of Granma and Grampa Joad, would seem to be particularly heart-breaking—they are the first to leave the family (though others, such as Noah and Connie, later leave of their own volition) on their journey to California, and in many ways it is difficult to gauge the reactions of the family. There are no tears, and …

View Post

The Powerful and the Powerless

In Steinbeck (2), The Travel Habit by Veronica0 Comments

Throughout John Steinbeck’s “The Grapes of Wrath,” incidents of corruption occur in which the poor, or the powerless, are exploited by the rich, or the powerful. There seems to be this struggle of power, especially nearing the end of the novel. I want to explore this struggle of power, first by discussing how people in power keep themselves in power …

View Post

Can humans manage themselves?

In Steinbeck (2) by Coco0 Comments

What interested me a lot was the government-run camp in Weedpatch, in which Tom and the family stay at for a little while. The camp that the family enters somewhat resembles a socialistic-mini-utopia. There are public spaces and private spaces in the camp. Each family has their camp setup where they sleep and cook and eat, yet all camp members share …

View Post

What You Don’t See Flying Over Middle America

In Steinbeck (2), The Travel Habit by Laura1 Comment

John Steinbeck’s novel The Grapes of Wrath received rave reviews at the time of its publishing and simultaneously ignited a group of dissenters protesting the inaccuracy of the depiction of Oklahoma and the hardships of the time. Samantha Baskind wrote in her article The “True” Story: Life Magazine, Horace Bristol, and John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath about the large …

View Post

Driving Desperation

In Steinbeck (1), The Travel Habit by Laura1 Comment

The first half of The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck contains a series of deaths and horrible misfortunes as they travel considerable distances in an effort to find a safe haven. The interesting aspect of this is that despite all of this, the characters continue to trek on through the tragedies towards the West. It would seem as though …

View Post

Conspiring Against Community

In Steinbeck (2), The Travel Habit by Jaxx0 Comments

I remember discussing the theme of community in Tom Kromer’s Waiting for Nothing. While there were some instances during the Depression when people had the greedy, every-man-for-himself attitude, I’ve found it is almost always the lower classes that go out of their way to help one another. In Waiting for Nothing, Kromer and a woman plan a meal with the …

See All The Travel Habit Posts
View Post

The Organisation of a Nation: A Reflection on Felix Luna’s A Short History of the Argentinians

In Book #2, The Art of Travel by Hashmita0 Comments

How does one begin to re-organise a country with a history of colonisation, military dictatorships and authoritarian leaders? Félix Luna, in his book A Short History of the Argentinians, talks about the “Argentinian people’s will to organise themselves federally” – not only in political, but in social terms too. He suggests that one’s “distinctive regional, provincial and local identities” affect …

View Post

My First Friendsgiving

In Prague, Thanksgiving by Zianna0 Comments

This was my first “Friendsgiving.” Though it’s my third year in college, I flew home for Thanksgiving as a freshman, and spent the holiday with relatives in Brooklyn last year. Since I’m 4,000 miles away from the states, neither was really possible this year. So I went to Amsterdam for the weekend with my roommate Carmen and her brother, who …

View Post

Prague Potraviny

In Prague, Strangers, The Art of Travel by Kai0 Comments

The glowing neon sign pierces the icy air beckoning to passersby. Its glowing greenish sign plainly states its status as a store while it leers at you from down the street. As you approach, a couple Czech men and their dogs sit on the ledge to the right of the store drinking beers, smoking cigarettes, and talking shit. They act …

View Post

The Coffee Man on the Corner

In Florence, Strangers, The Art of Travel by Cassi0 Comments

One of my favorite parts about studying abroad has been the people that I have met and the conversations I have had. In each country, I have met at least 3 people who have helped me, talked with me, or have even known someone I know. I think that one of the most beautiful parts of traveling is people. People …

View Post

Ozark Thanksgiving

In Thanksgiving, The Art of Travel by Nathan1 Comment

Since Thanksgiving is a very big deal in my household, I decided it would  be best to fly home. Each year between twenty five and thirty five people gather in and around our family’s one room cabin in the Missouri Ozarks. My dad grew up in a big family–he was one of eight children–and each year for Thanksgiving it’s become …

View Post

Fear and Comfort

In Buenos Aires, Thanksgiving, The Art of Travel by JT1 Comment

Although I have never gone back home from NYU for Thanksgiving (California is so far!), it is still one of my favorite holidays. I usually love watching how the city changes as people travel near and far, and to and from New York to be with their families just as much as I love stuffing my face with food and …

View Post

Turkey in Prague

In Prague, Thanksgiving, The Art of Travel by Kai0 Comments

Thanksgiving has always been a strange time for me. I’ve had multiple holidays where I have been completely detached from American traditions and then many more where I was quarrelling and laughing with my extended family. This Thanksgiving was a combination of the two. My friend, Katarina, was visiting from Paris and after the stress of the election it was wonderful …

See All The Art of Travel Posts
View Post

Take a peek at Elton John’s impressive photography collection

In News, Travel Habit News by Prof0 Comments

Elton John might be better known across the globe for his catchy tunes, yet he is starting to gather a reputation for this passion for art and his impressive photography collection.The singer’s home in Atlanta currently houses more than 8,000 images taken between 1920 and 1950 with about 70 photographers featured. Among the collection there are works by Berenice Abbott, …

View Post

After nearly fading into obscurity, Route 66 celebrates 90th birthday

In News, Travel Habit News by Prof0 Comments

In several respects, the automobile was one of the most significant inventions of the twentieth century, but often overlooked and equally significant is the development of the roads those automobiles traveled upon. Route 66 was not the first cross-country road nor is it the oldest road, but the highway has lodged itself into the imagination of travelers and became one …

View Post

Dorothea Lange’s Granddaughter Continues Her Legacy

In News, Travel Habit News by Prof0 Comments

Dorothea Lange is best known for her portraiture photography documenting America’s Great Depression. Her image “Migrant Mother” depicts a destitute woman with three children in California. It is one of the most recognized photographic portrayals of that era. When Lange passed away in 1965, her granddaughter, Dyanna Taylor, inherited one of her cameras and began to follow in her footsteps. …

View Post

LIFE Magazine Launched 80 Years Ago with Margaret Bourke-White photos

In News, Travel Habit News by Prof0 Comments

The story that made the cover of the very first issue of LIFE Magazine—published on Nov. 23, 1936—was, the magazine’s editors admitted, perhaps surprising. The photo of Fort Peck Dam in Montana, by Margaret Bourke-White, was a stark and graphic image, accompanying a more human story about the people whose lives were changed by the New Deal project. It was …

View Post

The American Dream: Minimum wage workers still buy it. The wealthy are skeptical

In News, Travel Habit News by Prof0 Comments

CNNMoney traveled to three key battleground states in September — Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania. We spoke to over 80 voters across a wide spectrum and asked them all if they had lived the American Dream. Nearly everyone said yes.It was an unexpected outflow of optimism in a year when 71% of voters say the economy is rigged, according to a …

View Post

Walker Evans: Depth of Field exhibit will make you want to shoot film again

In News, Travel Habit News by Prof0 Comments

Walker Evans may be best known for his work created for the Farm Security Administration program, but the latest exhibit at the Vancouver Art Gallery proves that the man’s career covered much more ground than post-depression America. The exhibit, appropriately titled Depth of Field, showcases more than 200 photographs from Evans’ 50-year career, beginning in the 1920s and ending just before his …

See All News Posts